FEMA

TB3-Non-Residential Floodproofing

FEMA P-348 - Protecting Building
Utility Systems from Flood Damage, 2nd Edition (2/17)

TB1-Openings in Foundations Walls and walls of Enclosures

Provides guidance on the NFIP regulations concerning watertight construction and the required certification for floodproofed non-residential buildings in Zones A, AE, A1-A30, AR, AO, and AH whose lowest floors are below the Base Flood Elevation.
FEMA Form 086-0-34 Floodproofing Cert.
Provides guidance on the NFIP regulations concerning the requirement for openings in below-Base Flood Elevation foundation walls and walls of enclosures for buildings located in Zones A, AE, A1-A30, AR, AO, and AH.
The overall objective of this publication is to assist in the construction of buildings with building utility systems that are designed and built so that the buildings can be re-occupied and fully operational as soon as electricity and sewer and water are restored to the neighborhood.

TB7-Wet Floodproofing Requirements

TB11-Crawlspace Construction in SFHA

TB10-Structures Built on Fill near SFHA are safe from flooding

Provides guidance on the NFIP regulations concerning wet floodproofing of certain types of structures located in Zones A, AE, A1-A30, AR, AO, and AH.
Provides interim guidance on minimum NFIP requirements as well as best practices for crawlspace construction in the Special Flood Hazard Area.
This technical bulletin discusses building techniques, including the use of fill, that can be used to ensure structures are reasonably safe from flooding.

FEMA P-347 - Above the Flood: Elevationg your Floodprone House

Answers to Questions about the National Flood Insurance Program

FEMA 54, Elevated Residential Structures

This publication shows how floodprone houses in south Florida were elevated above the 100-year flood level following Hurricane Andrew. Alternative elevation techniques are also demonstrated.
This booklet is intended to acquaint the public with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). Despite the highly technical nature of the Program, there has been a deliberate effort to minimize the use of technical terms. This publication is designed for readers who do not need a detailed history or refined technical or legal explanations, but do need a basic understanding of the program and the answers to some frequently asked questions. Readers who need legal definitions should refer to the Standard Flood Insurance Policy and to NFIP and related regulations.
Flooding in residential areas is bound to happen in flood-prone areas resulting in property damage. This manual is for designers, developers, builders, and others who wish to build elevated residential structures in flood-prone areas.

FEMA P-85, Protecting Manufactured Homes from Floods and Other Hazards

Reducing Damage from Localized Flooding: A Guide for Communities

FEMA P-85 has been updated to reflect the requirements of the most current codes and standards and to provide a best practices approach in reducing damages from natural hazards. While the original version of FEMA 85 concentrated on flood and wind events, this version also addresses seismic hazards and recommends several multi-hazard resistant foundation designs. Designs are included for wood-framed foundations, conventional concrete and masonry pier foundations, and ground anchors. The ground anchor foundations are based on results from a series of first-of-its-kind saturated and dry soil anchor tests.
This guide is intended to help local offices in cities, towns, villages, and counties in the United States understand what they can do to reduce the damage, disruption, and public and private costs that result from the shallow, localized flooding that occurs within their jurisdictions. This is flooding that all too often escapes the attention received by larger floods or those that are clearly mapped and subject to floodplain development regulations.

Protecting Floodplain Resources - A Guidebook for Communities

This guidebook has been written to introduce officials and citizens at the local level to a basic understanding of natural resources in floodplains and to offer suggestions for creating strategies for wisely managing these important areas. As scientific understanding of ecosystems grows, the importance of conserving and restoring the natural resources and functions of floodplains is increasingly recognized. Historically effective floodplain management was recognized as a necessary task to reduce the loss of life and property. However, floodplain areas are now also recognized as having an intrinsic value of their own as a part of the interconnected ecosystem and an influential role in increasing a community's quality of life

eLOMA

NFIP Elevation Certificate

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) Elevation Certificate (EC) (FEMA form 086-0-33) is an administrative tool of the NFIP which is to be used to provide elevation information necessary to ensure compliance with community floodplain management ordinances, to determine the proper insurance premium rate, or support a request for a Letter of Map Amendment (LOMA) or a Letter of Map Amendment based on fill (LOMR-F).
This time saving, user friendly web-based application will provide licensed land surveyors and professional engineers (Licensed Professionals) with a system to submit simple Letter of Map Amendment (LOMA) requests to FEMA. This tool is designed to make a determination based on the information submitted by the Licensed Professional and allow them to generate a determination from FEMA in minutes, provided all pertinent data is on file and the request is not audited.

FEMA P-1037 - Reducing Flood Risk to Residential Buildings that cannot be elevated

This publication presents a range of flood protection measures available as alternatives to traditional structural elevation for homeowners whose residences meet both of the following conditions:
      1 - The residences are existing buildings. This publication is not intended to address construction of new buildings in floodprone areas as these structures should be sufficiently elevated and built in conformance with NFIP and local floodplain management regulations.
      2 - The residences are not Substantially Damaged or Substantially Improved, meaning that the buildings have not sustained damage or undergone improvement (i.e., reconstruction, rehabilitation, addition) where the cost of the damage or improvement exceeds 50 percent of the market value of the building before the damage occurred or improvement began. As with new construction, Substantially Damaged or Substantially Improved structures must be re-built in conformance with NFIP and local floodplain management regulations.